Birkebein

Primarily for winter-sports. Things related to NHL, european Hockey and Cross Country Skiing.

Blueshirts United - Looking Back and Ahead: Mats Zuccarello

After a slow start, the 2013-14 season became one to remember for Mats Zuccarello. He began the season pointless through his first seven games, leading to him being scratched on October 24 against Philadelphia. He was re-inserted into the lineup in Detroit two days later and scored a goal to tie the game, which the Rangers would go on to win. Zuccarello would go on to score 59 points over his last 70 games to lead the team in the regular season, easily making 2013-14 the best season of Zuccarello’s young career.

Rosenborg Elite Hockey in the Norwegian GET Liga are officially over.
But already before it was officially announced that Rosenborg would quit, coach Jan Morten Dahl had plans of starting a new (yet unnamed) hockey team in Trondheim. 
Dahl has had offers to join other teams as assistant coach, but wants to dedicate himself to the local hockey scene, He’s already gained the loyalty of 5-6 players with lots of experience from the GET Liga, and added to this some young talent, thinks they stand good chances of getting up to the first division in their first year. But Dahl wants to be clever about the final push into the GET Liga, and wait until they’ve got a good administration, and a good economy. He makes a point out of building this club properly, from the foundation. Hopefully excluding the factors that made Rosenborg so economically unstable in the first place.
All this sounds good to me! Hope to once again see a hockey team from Trondheim in the GET Liga in 4-5 years. It’s quite frankly also necessary for the GET Liga to have some geographical diversity. 

Rosenborg Elite Hockey in the Norwegian GET Liga are officially over.

But already before it was officially announced that Rosenborg would quit, coach Jan Morten Dahl had plans of starting a new (yet unnamed) hockey team in Trondheim. 

Dahl has had offers to join other teams as assistant coach, but wants to dedicate himself to the local hockey scene, He’s already gained the loyalty of 5-6 players with lots of experience from the GET Liga, and added to this some young talent, thinks they stand good chances of getting up to the first division in their first year. But Dahl wants to be clever about the final push into the GET Liga, and wait until they’ve got a good administration, and a good economy. He makes a point out of building this club properly, from the foundation. Hopefully excluding the factors that made Rosenborg so economically unstable in the first place.

All this sounds good to me! Hope to once again see a hockey team from Trondheim in the GET Liga in 4-5 years. It’s quite frankly also necessary for the GET Liga to have some geographical diversity. 

(Source: adressa.no)

"Uzbekistan was catapulted into the chess world when one of its nationals, nine-year-old Nodirbek Abdusattorov, beat a FIDE rated 2600 chess grandmaster, Andrei Zhigalko, in the first round of a local tournament. The grandmaster made no erratic blunders. Rather, it was precise play that ensured Nodirbek’s victory. Zhigalko played the black pieces and the popular Sicilian defence, but instead of playing the usual setup, White opted for an old move, a favourite of Bobby Fischer, 3. d3, closing the centre. It represented an ingenious move by Nodirbek to counter suspected home preparation.But Nodirbek obviously was not fully satisfied with his lone grandmaster victory, and proceeded to annihilate a second grandmaster, his compatriot Ruslan Khusnutdinov, in the same tournament. By doing so, he dispelled any doubt that the win against Zhigalko was a chance occurrence.”
Source

"Uzbekistan was catapulted into the chess world when one of its nationals, nine-year-old Nodirbek Abdusattorov, beat a FIDE rated 2600 chess grandmaster, Andrei Zhigalko, in the first round of a local tournament. 

The grandmaster made no erratic blunders. Rather, it was precise play that ensured Nodirbek’s victory. Zhigalko played the black pieces and the popular Sicilian defence, but instead of playing the usual setup, White opted for an old move, a favourite of Bobby Fischer, 3. d3, closing the centre. It represented an ingenious move by Nodirbek to counter suspected home preparation.

But Nodirbek obviously was not fully satisfied with his lone grandmaster victory, and proceeded to annihilate a second grandmaster, his compatriot Ruslan Khusnutdinov, in the same tournament. By doing so, he dispelled any doubt that the win against Zhigalko was a chance occurrence.”

Source

pittsburghpengwins:

After 24 years of playing professional hockey, Alexei Kovalev has retired. 
Kovalev was the first ever Russian player to be drafted in the first round, the first ever Russian to captain an all star team, and the first ever Russian to win the Stanley Cup.
Kovalev has played in 1,316 NHL regular season games, the most of any other Russian player.  He also has 430 career goals and 599 assists; and 45 goals and 55 assists in 123 playoff games.
He first played professionally for Dynamo Moscow, and has since played for the New York Rangers, Pittsburgh Penguins (twice), Montreal Canadiens, Ak Bars Kazan, Ottawa Senators, Atlant Moscow Oblast, Florida Panthers, and finally the EHC Visp of the Swiss B League. 
He’s represented his country in the 1990 (silver) and 1991 (silver) European Junior Championships, 1992 World Junior Championship (gold), 1992 Winter Olympics (gold), 1992 World Championship, 1996 World Cup, 1998 World Championship, 2002 Winter Olympics (bronze), 2004 World Cup, 2005 World Championship, and the 2006 Winter Olympics. 
In his final season with the EHC Visp of the Swiss National League B, he led his team to the championship, scoring 29 goals and 41 assists in 59 games at 41 years old. 
"Unfortunately I have to retire because of my injuries.  I’d have loved to play until I’m 50 but the injuries from the last few seasons don’t let me continue my career.  It’s a hard decision for me but it is what it is. It was my last season.” (x)

pittsburghpengwins:

After 24 years of playing professional hockey, Alexei Kovalev has retired. 

Kovalev was the first ever Russian player to be drafted in the first round, the first ever Russian to captain an all star team, and the first ever Russian to win the Stanley Cup.

Kovalev has played in 1,316 NHL regular season games, the most of any other Russian player.  He also has 430 career goals and 599 assists; and 45 goals and 55 assists in 123 playoff games.

He first played professionally for Dynamo Moscow, and has since played for the New York Rangers, Pittsburgh Penguins (twice), Montreal Canadiens, Ak Bars Kazan, Ottawa Senators, Atlant Moscow Oblast, Florida Panthers, and finally the EHC Visp of the Swiss B League. 

He’s represented his country in the 1990 (silver) and 1991 (silver) European Junior Championships, 1992 World Junior Championship (gold), 1992 Winter Olympics (gold), 1992 World Championship, 1996 World Cup, 1998 World Championship, 2002 Winter Olympics (bronze), 2004 World Cup, 2005 World Championship, and the 2006 Winter Olympics. 

In his final season with the EHC Visp of the Swiss National League B, he led his team to the championship, scoring 29 goals and 41 assists in 59 games at 41 years old. 

"Unfortunately I have to retire because of my injuries.  I’d have loved to play until I’m 50 but the injuries from the last few seasons don’t let me continue my career.  It’s a hard decision for me but it is what it is. It was my last season.” (x)

(via lileflottante)

wsj:

Magnus Carlsen’s Parents on Raising the World’s Best Chess Player 

How do you spot a chess prodigy? Is there a moment—perhaps when he makes a boldly brilliant move out of nowhere or plasters his bedroom with pinups of Bobby Fischer and Garry Kasparov—when it all becomes clear? Well, that wasn’t quite how it happened for Henrik Carlsen and Sigrun Øen, parents of 23-year-old Magnus Carlsen, the Norwegian who became a grandmaster at 13 and the youngest-ever world No. 1 at 19, and whose peak World Chess Federation rating (2,882) is the highest in history. Last November, Carlsen defeated Viswanathan Anand to become the World Chess Champion, a title he will defend against Anand later this year in a yet-to-be-decided location—possibly Norway.
Carlsen’s route to chess took a little longer than his subsequent stellar progression might suggest. Henrik, 52, a keen chess player himself, remembers introducing the game to Magnus and his older sister, Ellen, now 25, when his son was turning 5. But after a month or two, Henrik says, “I gave up, basically, in the sense that we continued to play chess occasionally, but I didn’t have any ambitions.” 
Read the full article in WSJ. Magazine.

wsj:

Magnus Carlsen’s Parents on Raising the World’s Best Chess Player

How do you spot a chess prodigy? Is there a moment—perhaps when he makes a boldly brilliant move out of nowhere or plasters his bedroom with pinups of Bobby Fischer and Garry Kasparov—when it all becomes clear? Well, that wasn’t quite how it happened for Henrik Carlsen and Sigrun Øen, parents of 23-year-old Magnus Carlsen, the Norwegian who became a grandmaster at 13 and the youngest-ever world No. 1 at 19, and whose peak World Chess Federation rating (2,882) is the highest in history. Last November, Carlsen defeated Viswanathan Anand to become the World Chess Champion, a title he will defend against Anand later this year in a yet-to-be-decided location—possibly Norway.

Carlsen’s route to chess took a little longer than his subsequent stellar progression might suggest. Henrik, 52, a keen chess player himself, remembers introducing the game to Magnus and his older sister, Ellen, now 25, when his son was turning 5. But after a month or two, Henrik says, “I gave up, basically, in the sense that we continued to play chess occasionally, but I didn’t have any ambitions.”

Read the full article in WSJ. Magazine.

(via enpasant)

So this is Vålerenga director Jan Tore Kjær (left) with KHL representatives in Oslo. Amongst others Dmitry Kurbatov, who’s Hockey Operations Vice-President in the KHL. 
And according to him, whether or not Vålerenga will have a KHL-team from 2015, will be decided within the next couple of months. 
And Kjær confirms they’ve visited Oslo Spektrum, that many have speculated could be used as a hockey arena. So it seems that getting a Norwegian team in the KHL is still a work in progress. 

So this is Vålerenga director Jan Tore Kjær (left) with KHL representatives in Oslo. Amongst others Dmitry Kurbatov, who’s Hockey Operations Vice-President in the KHL. 

And according to him, whether or not Vålerenga will have a KHL-team from 2015, will be decided within the next couple of months. 

And Kjær confirms they’ve visited Oslo Spektrum, that many have speculated could be used as a hockey arena. So it seems that getting a Norwegian team in the KHL is still a work in progress. 

(Source: tv2.no)

Today it became official, Rosenborg Elite Hockey from Trondheim, Norway are out of the GET Liga due to economic issues.
This despite heroic work from the club and the fans who managed to collect considerable funds these last few weeks. Whether the club will terminate all hockey related work, or start anew in the 2nd division is still uncertain.
Rosenborg was the closest thing I had to a home team I suppose, closest in terms of geography at-least, so this is a loss. It’s also a loss for the GET Liga, as Rosenborg was by far northernmost club, and now high level Norwegian club hockey has become a southern Norwegian affair. 
The Oslo club Manglerud Star might replace Rosenborg in the GET Liga, and Manglerud is one of the most revered clubs, historically, in Norway. A lot of the talent you see these days in various Norwegian clubs and abroad, came through the Manglerud system. Hope to see them in the GET Liga come hockey season!

Today it became official, Rosenborg Elite Hockey from Trondheim, Norway are out of the GET Liga due to economic issues.

This despite heroic work from the club and the fans who managed to collect considerable funds these last few weeks. Whether the club will terminate all hockey related work, or start anew in the 2nd division is still uncertain.

Rosenborg was the closest thing I had to a home team I suppose, closest in terms of geography at-least, so this is a loss. It’s also a loss for the GET Liga, as Rosenborg was by far northernmost club, and now high level Norwegian club hockey has become a southern Norwegian affair. 

The Oslo club Manglerud Star might replace Rosenborg in the GET Liga, and Manglerud is one of the most revered clubs, historically, in Norway. A lot of the talent you see these days in various Norwegian clubs and abroad, came through the Manglerud system. Hope to see them in the GET Liga come hockey season!

(Source: dagbladet.no)